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Designing for zero-waste

Designing for zero-waste

How challenging is it to bring a zero-waste collection from concept to retail? With Redress Design Award 2018 Winner Tess Whitfort’s passion for zero-waste evident in her competition collection we weren’t surprised to see that her commercial collection with The R Collective went beyond rescuing textile waste through upcycling, but also used innovative zero-waste design techniques to showcase a truly a circular fashion system.

Hong Kong's public unite to recycle unwanted clothing as Redress pushes for more avenues for recovery

Hong Kong's public unite to recycle unwanted clothing as Redress pushes for more avenues for recovery

We're leading the charge in helping the Hong Kong public rethink their wardrobe waste. In partnership with laundry experts, Miele, 4.5 tonnes of clothing were collected this week after a short citywide campaign proving that consumers have no desire to throw away their unwanted clothing – of which almost 100% can be recycled. Engaging consumers on the value of keeping clothing in action for longer through better care, the clothing drive is part of our mission to expand our work to save more clothing from landfills.

What happens to clothing that goes unsold?

What happens to clothing that goes unsold?

No one knows the true scale of ‘deadstock’ clothing waste — in other words, clothes that are unable to be sold at full or discounted price and must be gotten rid of somehow.

We know that around 100 billion garments are manufactured annually. Let’s say the sell-through rate (both full and discounted) is a generous 90%, then potentially 10 million items of clothing become ‘deadstock’ every year. That’s a lot of clothes to miraculously make ‘disappear.’ So what do brands and retailers claim to do with the products they can’t get customers to buy?