Designers

Redress Design Award 2018 Exhibition

Redress Design Award 2018 Exhibition

Select garments from their 2018 collections will be on display from 14–23 September at the Mercedes me Store , as part of HKTDC’s ‘Hong Kong in Fashion’ month-long city wide campaign promoting fashion, trends and creativity at various trendsetting hotspots!

The R Collective x Lia Kassif now in Lane Crawford

The R Collective x Lia Kassif now in Lane Crawford

Captivated by alumni designer Lia Kassif’s Redress Design Award 2017 collection (which combined military uniforms with bridalwear industry waste), up-cycled luxury brand, The R Collective jumped at the chance to work with Lia to develop their own capsule collection.

People's Choice Award announced

People's Choice Award announced

After seeing thousands of global votes cast over four-week period, we are pleased to announce that the public have spoken. New-York based Korean designer, Mimi Jeong, has been selected as favourite designer for her outstanding Redress Design Award 2018 submission and takes home the title of Redress Design Award 2018 ‘People’s Choice’ winner. Mimi made a lasting impression with her collection that up-cycles a variety of textiles including swatches and cut-and-sew waste, and was inspired by the works of Catalan architect, Antoni Gaudi. Using vibrant colour and the artist’s signature mosaic designs she creates a collection full of sculptural form.

Training the trainers

Training the trainers

In 2005, Dame Ellen McArthur became the fastest solo sailor to circumnavigate the globe. During her journey, she realised just how important her resources were to survival: “Suddenly I realised our global economy is no different,” she told sustainable consultants McKinsey.

Today, Dame Ellen is one of the world’s most high profile proponents of a circular economy, in which waste is no longer discarded but becomes, instead, another precious resource.

Going circular

Going circular

My mother always told me “What goes around comes around”. I’ve carried this philosophy through life; even into how I think about how we make and dispose of clothes and how I imagine the circular economy.

The circular economy can sometimes seem confusing. But it’s simple. Think of how Mother Nature does it, she’s the circular economy master. When a tree falls over and decomposes, every part of that tree is put to good use feeding the forest floor and enriching all biodiversity,  soil, slugs, fungi and fauna included.

Emerging brand: Leif Erikkson

Emerging brand: Leif Erikkson

“Confidence is so important. It’s so vital to be confident in your work and speak with authority. Giving yourself time to learn your medium from A-Z will definitely help with that. Because at the end of the day, you are your business.”

Entering the EcoChic Design Award 2014/15 was finalist Catherine Hudson’s first step into sustainable fashion: “I was shown the effects of throwaway fashion and how damaging it was to the environment,” she recalls. “And I wanted to be part of the solution - to be fashion forward in my work ethic as well as in my design execution.”    

Award-winning designer Kate Morris’ up-cycled Pop collection turns waste into want

Award-winning designer Kate Morris’ up-cycled Pop collection turns waste into want

First prizewinner of the Redress Design Award 2017 (formerly the EcoChic Design Award), Kate Morris’ sustainable knitwear Pop Collection launches with The R Collective, the pioneering up-cycled fashion brand and social impact business. Born from NGO Redress, The R Collective is determined to change wasteful practices in the fashion industry. Kate’s playful, pop-art inspired limited collection consists of 8 knitwear styles, including reversible coatigans, sweaters and turtle necks, all of which were created by up-cycling luxury yarn waste in a design collaboration with knitwear brand, 22 Factor.

Rethinking fashion

Rethinking fashion

We celebrated the launch of the eighth cycle of our flagship programme, the Redress Design Award (formerly the EcoChic Design Award) – the world’s largest sustainable fashion design competition - with an event underpinning our mission at Eaton House in Hong Kong on January 19th. A panel of industry experts reflected on the current state of sustainable fashion and why 2018 represents a critical tipping point for consumers, designers and brands to incorporate sustainability across the supply chain. We also heard from Redress Design Award Alumni designer Victor Chu on his experiences participating in the competition and his latest design collaboration with new up-cycling brand, The R Collective, which was on display.

Driving waste from runway to retail

Driving waste from runway to retail

BYT has arrived! Championing Redress' 10 year legacy, BYT, the luxe up-cycled social impact fashion brand - with an ambition to prove that fashion can be a force for good - enjoyed its runway debut this month in Hong Kong before hitting Lane Crawford's prestigious retail store and global online platform.

Tackling Real-Life Waste

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In the lead up to the Grand Final show, our EcoChic Design Award finalists were united in Hong Kong to explore the multiple possibilities for tackling real-life textile waste scenarios. Competing in challenges focused on circular economy models, our designers crafted prototypes for new lifestyle products from Cathay Pacific’s retired uniforms at the Langham, Hong Kong; rescued discarded clothes from Hong Kong’s clothing bins through simple care techniques with Miele; and got a taste of the production line and the critical role that designers play even at the manufacturing stage with TAL Group. These challenges showed these young designers first-hand how improved interactions between designers, manufacturers and consumers can significantly alter the overall environmental impact of every single piece of clothing. Congratulations to all our winners!

Click here to revisit our favourite moments from the week.

Kate Morris wins the EcoChic Design Award 2017

Fierce aesthetic and innovative techniques applied to a range of unusual and sometimes surprising materials combined to impress the distinguished judges, and dazzle 600 of the region’s most influential industry players and VIP onlookers last night at the EcoChic Design Award Grand final. British designer Kate Morris won first prize demonstrating the power of the circular economy, where nothing goes to waste. 

Kate will now join a team of fashion game-changers to create a collection for BYT, a new Hong Kong affordable luxury brand born from Redress. BYT’s inaugural up-cycled collection, which was designed by previous EcoChic Design Award competition winners, will retail in Lane Crawford and Barneys in New York, demonstrating Asia as a leading fashion powerhouse, and the changing ethical tastes of luxury consumers worldwide.

“I believe the fashion industry has reached a critical point and I want to part of the change – designing sustainable items of beauty for the masses is my dream and I am excited about winning this competition as it will me enable to contribute to a better future” said Kate. 

Kate will also see her winning collection, a bright and playful knitwear collection which mixed handcraft with technology, and focused on the three design techniques of the collection – zero-waste, up-cycling and reconstruction – in an installation at Lane Crawford, Asia’s leading iconic luxury department store.

Competition judge, Joanna Gunn, Chief Brand Officer, Lane Crawford, said “As part of Lane Crawford’s commitment to supporting young emerging talent, we are pleased to support the EcoChic Design Award and its cause of promoting sustainability in fashion with the next generation of designers.”

REDESIGNING BUSINESS

REDESIGNING BUSINESS

Getting a hand on sustainable fashion design is one thing. But grasping sustainable business philosophies, which salute the triple bottom line of people, planet and profits, is another.  EcoChic Design Award 2014/15 Special Prize winner, Laurensia Salim, had the chance to stretch her business horizons as she claimed her winning educational prize of visiting John Hardy’s design and production facilities in Bali in June 2015.

EAST MEETS...WASTE AND IT NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD

EAST MEETS...WASTE AND IT NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD

[Throwback] It’d been a busy year for Kévin Germanier, our The EcoChic Design Award 2014/15 winner. The media furore that followed him from Hong Kong’s runway back to his London home stayed with Kévin until his return to Hong Kong in September 2015 for his winning prize; to spend three intense months creating his up-cycled collection with Shanghai Tang. He hit the floor running, with his trademark charm and smiles in tow, to work shoulder to shoulder with China’s leading luxury brand’s team on each step of the process, from design, production, sourcing, marketing and merchandising, as he prepared his collection, and visions, for sale.

Up-cycled luxury

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Following her First Prize win for the EcoChic Design Award 2015/16, Polish rising star Patrycja Guzik returned to Hong Kong to embed herself in the Shanghai Tang design team to learn how sustainable fashion can be implemented on a commercial scale. Currently on showcase at the brand’s Duddell Street flagship store in Hong Kong, the resulting up-cycled capsule collection was created from surplus luxury fabrics from the brand’s previous collections. Pat took inspiration from Redress’ hometown, incorporating the rich purples and blues of our megalopolis’ night skyline, and playful ruffle details to emulate Victoria Harbour’s lapping waters into her designs. Click here to learn more about this creative collaboration for change. 

SUSTAINABILITY: THE FABRIC OF MODERN CHINESE CHIC

The EcoChic Design Award 2014/15 1st Prize Winner Kévin Germanier’s up-cycled collection is set to hit China’s leading luxury brand, Shanghai Tang’s, stores this September. The seven-piece womenswear capsule collection will be the brand’s first sustainable collection; up-cycled using their surplus textile stock, demonstrating that sustainability is part of a growing global trend to create fashion in a more environmentally sustainable way. Click here to find out more.